Dan Cottrell's Better Rugby Coaching - Free weekly newsletterClick here to sign up for my FREE coaching tips email! Receive GREAT advice straight into your inbox each and every week to help you become a better rugby coach!
The Huddle | Rugby Forum, Chat with Rugby Trainers & Professional Coaches
The Huddle is the forum of Dan Cottrell's Better Rugby Coaching website
Better Rugby Coaching
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        



Game Analysis Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 30/10/2007 13:48:47
Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Administrators
Last Login: 20/03/2014 17:10:27
Posts: 125, Visits: 1,396
To my mind if you don’t record what happened in a game, you can only monitor your team’s development by results and your players from memory. I think this is unsatisfactory. I advocate a game analysis system to enhance your ability to assess these things and boost the quality of your feedback. Attached are a Game Analysis Sheet template and a completed example.

With a simple game analysis sheet like this, you can record all aspects of all your players' games, be it tackling, passing, supporting, scrummaging, or kicking, etc., using ticks or a number rating system (such as 1–10). The analysis can also be used at half time to praise individuals or to identify areas which need improving. However, we don’t advocate comparing individuals directly and don’t use the analysis to criticise individual players.

How do other coaches ensure they record team and player information from games? Do they think the system we use is appropriate? I'd appreciate your views.

Best,

Toby Curthoys
Publisher, Better Rugby Coaching

www.betterrugbycoaching.com

  Post Attachments 
GameAnalysisSheetExample.pdf (5,930 views, 131.79 KB)
GameAnalysisSheet.pdf (5,092 views, 16.28 KB)

Post #418
Posted 31/10/2007 08:52:19
Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 14:54:04
Posts: 1,166, Visits: 4,832
looks comprehensive Toby, but is it intended as a "wrap up" sheet, or a "wprk in progress" sheet?

ie is its use more for summarising other game stats that were made in other ways, or woud it rather be a live game stat/analysis recording device (profiling) as play continues?

I can see its use as the former quite clearly (as per the example) - but in which case how would you be collating the underlying profiling information to create the analysis sheet from?  I can't easily see how however it could be sued for the latter - something may be esscaping me!

cheers

didds

Post #420
Posted 01/11/2007 09:18:44
Forum Guru

Forum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum Guru

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 22/02/2012 12:12:19
Posts: 71, Visits: 151
I intend to try it out after this weekend game, it should produce a very valuable record of players consistency and development, this couod then be the basis of completing the positional profiling analysis.
Post #423
Posted 07/11/2007 10:11:42
Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 17/01/2012 20:00:07
Posts: 213, Visits: 505
If you are feeling really keen try http://www.sportsperformer.com.au/index.htm for PC based video analysis.
Post #444
Posted 11/11/2007 11:17:51


Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 09/05/2008 16:58:57
Posts: 5, Visits: 17
I use the sheet both during games for realtime analysis and after games as a summary sheet and consequently a planning sheet for training.

Realtime: I use a code of dots for "good" and crosses for "poor" bits of play in the four categories. I will either focus on 4 or 5 players or a couple of units (ie centres, back row). Alternatively I get my subs to watch 3 or 4 players each and record the results. Quite often I'll only analysise the first half and then a quick glance just before half time allows me to give accurate performance to individuals and units.

Summary: I use a simpler sheets to record good and bad in the 4 sections and then sit down with my other coaches to give scores out of 10 to each player. This highlights areas of weakness and strength and forms the basis of planning for the next week.

I tend to pick an area that I have doubts about (support play for example) and focus on that for a week or two and then move on. Experience has told me that if you try and see everything you end up seeing nothing. This is where videoing games if possible is invaluable, although the analysis can take over your life if you let it.

The other thing you can do is say to your players building up to tha game that you are going to be focussing on their tackling and use it as a motivational tool.

I hope some of this helps and if you have any other questions just let me know.

Cheers

Paul

Post #450
Posted 03/01/2010 20:08:47
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 27/05/2010 09:27:15
Posts: 6, Visits: 89
Just to take it a step further, why not look at the outcomes of the process.

E.G.to say that you won a lineout is great, but what happened immediately after, was the ball driven and won and what happened from that play or was the ball untidy and lost to the opposition because you knocked on and a scrum awarded to the opposition.

for example during the 2009 Tri Nations the AB's were slammed for losing a large number of lineouts. From the South African viewpoint they were slammed for losing the ball after they had won it because of the AB lineout defence - in actual fact most lineouts that South Africa won against the head were lost through a scrum or penalty being awarded to the AB's. The factual analysis was correct but the result was different and did not tell the real story.

We analyse what we call our attack and defence completions.

A completion is a set number of phases (we use 3) from the set piece. Each phase needs to be yardage gained on each phase and what was the outcome - kick, turnover, scrum etc. If you do not gain yardage on all 3 then it is an 'incomplete' completion. This will tell you during the game whether or not you are achieving the first and second principles of play - Gain Possession and Go Forward.

Same with defence, a defence completion is not allowing the opposition over the gain line for a set number of phases. If completed this achieves the 1st two principles of defence - Go Forward and Apply Pressure.

These are now commonly used in 'pro' rugby. Gives you a more real time feel for the game.
Completions/Incompletions and Outcomes. These are easily noted in real time. A video can give you the actual stats after the game.

Checkout the following website for more info on video analysis.
Here they have audio interviews with a number of international video analysts and give a good insight.

http://thevideoanalyst.com/

Everyone is different and wants different information. We mix it up week by week.

It's like 5 people going into a movie and if you ask all 5 what it was about they will all tell you different stories.

It is whatever works for your team. Lots of good suggestions on this topic


click on the signature below to access my homepage

rugbycoach.co.nz
Post #2453
Posted 05/01/2010 20:15:26
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 16/03/2010 13:42:01
Posts: 4, Visits: 8
Couldn't agree more on the idea of really defining what you mean by a successful/unsuccessful outcome. Too often coaches can claim something is successful but really didn't benefit the team in any way. One technique worth considering is start off by using a very simple definition of un/successful e.g winning the first ball off a lineout to start off but as the season progresses you can 'stretch' this definition to mean a lineout is considered successful when you go through 3 phases after it.

Also on a more general note, coaches really shouldn't be afraid of technology. I know the discussion above has been on taking pen and paper stats (which is a great place to start) but even taking out your mobile phone and taking a few short videos at scrum training or lineout practice can be considered video analysis and will really help you coach your players.

Above all, regardless of using pen and paper or video analysis once you start to measure something you are giving yourself a better chance to concentrate your training on the right things.

You can check out my website http://www.thevideoanalyst.com for more info.

Rob Carroll
www.thevideoanalyst.com

Post #2455
Posted 11/02/2010 19:06:19
Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 02/08/2014 17:19:36
Posts: 168, Visits: 211
Was a 'video analyst' for a high performing university program this past year, with no fancy gadgets apart from my camera, some video editing softfware (free) on my computer, and occasionally another angle from a keen parent who was happy to do a quick transfer to my laptop after the game.

The head coach, a professional sports psychologist, knows that 'death by video' can be a reality, so we never showed a full game (but made copies available upon request to players). What I did was reviewed the match and made notes on trends. Being able to hit pause, rewind, etc. makes it easy to make strong qualitative assessments that I feel you can't as easily make at the field. I'd review the notes - making a point to also note the time of key moments in play - both good and not so good - that could show an example. What I then broke down with the players the next day were three examples of 'good stuff' and two examples of 'work ons.' Often these clips were no more than a minute long, but the review and discussion would often run 30-40 minutes.

Generally speaking, the players found this incredibly useful. All of our feedback was constructive and with a positive spin. I'd also start by saying that my intention is not to centre anyone out in the 'work ons' just to ensure there was no resentment. (Those players who had particularly poor matches would receive constructive, positive, but private feedback.)


While we're not always able to film, and even in my case didn't always have the best possibility to get good height / angle to show what I wanted to see, I have also used pen and pad for match analysis. Going on my previous statement about biases during match-play, or even immediately after a game, I opt to do more qualitative (or mixed, if time, per scenario) analysis. Almost always, these means taking stats. I've found I've been able to do Tackle Contest, Set Piece Possession, and Turnovers with very little problem. I think for amateur teams, these things can 'tell a story' when analysed after a game. What I've been trying more recently - and it took a lot of practice - was to also note what part of the field these things occurred. I sketched a map of the pitch, divided an numbered them into eight squares, and started each notation with that location code.

For example ... (and feel free to suggest alternatives as I'm still trying to fine tune it) ... a series of play might look like this.

Time Location Action Result
10 2 AR W
2 AR W
1 AR L (k-on) /
11 1 DS W (kick)
3 AL/O W
3 AM W
1 TRY (8 peeled, popped to 7)

I think you can figure out that A = we're attacking, D = we're defending, W(in), L(oss), L(ine)/O(ut), S(crum), etc. I use the / to show that a phase of play has ended and there's usually time enough to jot something qualitative after one. I'll sometimes miss the odd passage of play, but I think if you get between 70-80% right you can see some really telling statistics.

One thing that helps is working with a bunch of players who are really self aware and know when they have made mistakes, so I don't have to focus on that so much. Assistants and subs can give me a general idea of how they think individuals played, and I also ask for senior player feed back on this from a field perspective.

Post #2506
Posted 16/03/2010 13:44:13
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 16/03/2010 13:42:01
Posts: 4, Visits: 8
For those of you who want to learn a little more, especially for beginners. I have devised and interactive course. IT takes about 30 minutes to complete. This will guide you through the basics of using pen and paper right up to using computer and video.

Check it out here: www.thevideoanalyst.com/course

Rob Carroll
www.thevideoanalyst.com
Post #2561
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »


Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 1 (1 guest, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.
Forum Moderators: Admin, Toby, DanC, MarkL

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT, Time now is 4:56am

Free Rugby Drills
 
Links:

Rugby Drills

Rugby Tips Rugby Tackles Rugby Coaching
Rugby Training Rugby Training Tips Rugby Coaching Drills Training for Rugby
Tag Rugby Drills Rugby Rules